Advice & Reviews
September 23, 2015

ErP and the energy efficiency message

Earlier this year we posted an introduction to ErP to explain what it is and how it affects installers.  To follow this up we asked Adam Foy, Product Manager at Ideal Boilers, to guest blog on our behalf answering those commonly asked questions about the Energy Related Products (ErP) Directive – find out all you need to know below…

What exactly is the ErP Directive and why do I need to know about it?

The ErP Directive is a new regulation set by the European Union, designed to drive improvements in the efficiency and performance of heating and hot water products by ensuring that minimum primary and secondary levels of efficiency and emissions are met.

The Directive has been introduced to help countries in the EU become more energy efficient by enabling consumers to compare the energy rating of heating and hot water products. The EU’s target is to reduce energy use by 20%, as well as increase the share of renewable energies by 20% by 2020.

What products do the regulations apply to?

The regulations apply to both space and water heaters and is divided into two sections – Ecodesign and Energy Labelling. The Ecodesign Directive will mean space heaters and water heaters that haven’t met efficiency requirements won’t get a CE mark, and so manufacturers won’t be legally allowed to supply products into the supply chain.

The second, Energy Labelling (on boilers with an output of up to 70kW, which covers most domestic boilers) means affected heating products will now come with an efficiency rating and label. This includes gas and oil boilers, cylinders, heat pumps and solar thermal cylinders.

Will the energy label appear on the product itself?

The energy label does not need to appear on the product itself unless it is on display, i.e. at the merchant. It must be included with the product literature for products manufactured after 26th September, and if manufactured prior to that date it will be available from manufacturers’ websites.

What about Controls?

Controls will not carry an ErP label but play an important part in the calculation and rating of a package. Controls are classified into eight groups, each of which is allocated a percentage score, ranging from Class I (a simple on/off room thermostat) through to Class VIII (multi-sensor room control for use with modulating heating appliances).

Will installers be able to install a boiler that hasn’t got an energy label after 26th September?

Installers will still be able to use products purchased, or manufactured and in the supply chain prior to this date and the relevant energy efficiency data is available from manufacturers’ websites.

All Ideal domestic boilers manufactured from June 26th are ErP compliant and come complete with an energy label and fiche

Who is responsible?

Manufacturers and installers have joint responsibility for ensuring the directive is adhered to. Manufacturers will be responsible for supplying labels for their products and a standard table of information relating to that product, known as a ‘fiche’, these are included in all installation manuals.

Installers will be responsible for calculating and issuing a package label when they install a new heating system (known as a package), a package consists of one or more boilers, with one or more temperature controls and or solar.

What is a package label and how is it calculated?

Ideal Boilers is making it easy for installers to calculate and issue a package label labels via a simple online calculator here. The majority of installations will be ‘boiler + controls’, so filling in the necessary forms should only take installers a matter of minutes. The ErP calculator is also available on the Installer Connect app, so the installer can even generate a package label while still at the property.

In addition installers will need to fill out a system fiche (table of information) and leave this, and the label(s) for the individual products they have installed.

What happens if installers don’t do it?

Monitoring and surveillance will be the responsibility of the National Measurement Office (NMO). Compliance with the regulations will be mandatory, therefore installers must be aware of their responsibilities and adhere to the regulations from the start.

What happens if installers don’t do it?

Monitoring and surveillance will be the responsibility of the National Measurement Office (NMO). Compliance with the regulations will be mandatory, therefore installers must be aware of their responsibilities and adhere to the regulations from the start.

Everyone can benefit – upselling controls

The ErP Directive offers merchants and installers an opportunity to educate their customers about the potential energy saving they can achieve through upgrading their heating systems to more energy-efficient ones which will save them money over the lifetime of the system.

Adding quality heating controls and getting some good advice from their installer could save consumers a significant amount of money and keep their property warm and cosy when they need it.

Research recently published by BSRIA (Building Services Research and Information Association), showed that in 2014 only 4% of UK homes had multi-zone controls. BSRIA predicts that multi-zone controls will double in take-up by 2020 and 9% of homes will be using connected thermostats/control systems.

So there you have it, your complete low down on everything ErP – for more information call into your local MKM branch.